occasional & centre tables

Here you will find occasional & centre tables as well as tilt top tables, wine tables, supper tables & small gate leg tables

yew wood tilt top table

Mid 18th century yew wood and oak tilt top table of fine colour and proportions. W26". H25.5". Circa 1760. £1550

WILLIAM & MARY CANDLE STAND

William & Mary walnut candle stand with a quarter veneer top over a boldly turned spiral twist column and splayed legs. Circa 1690. W12.5". D12.5" H32". £2250

William & mary occasional table

William & Mary oak occasional table of small proportions. Raised on baluster turned legs and square stretchers. Circa 1690. W28.5". D33". H28". £1250

Charles II occasional table

17th century oak occasional table of small proportions with bold baluster turned columns, sqaure gates and a platform base. W30". D31". H28". Circa 1690 £1550

TILT TOP TABLE

George III Mahogany tilt top table with bird cage mechanism of good colour raised on a turned column and splayed legs Circa 1780. W30". £475

17TH CENTURY CREDENCE TABLE

Charles II oak folding or credence table of good colour with bobbin turned legs and square stretchers. Circa 1670. W38". D19". 29". SOLD

17th century walnut gate leg table

Fine Charles II walnut single leaf gate leg occasional table with a drawer at each end and raised on bold spiral twist legs and stretchers. Circa 1680. W34.5". D24"(open) H28". SOLD

FOLDING TABLE

Late 17th or early 18th century red walnut credence or folding table of small proportions. SOLD

robin wheatley antiques

We are available Wednesday to Saturday, between 10am and 5pm, 4 days a week. Although closed on Sunday’s, Mondays and Tuesdays.  It will be possible to arrange viewings outside our normal opening hours, via appointment – please call to discuss.

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occasional tables

Tables for occasional use became particularly popular as the 17th century drew on. Not only were necessary tables such as candle stands common but small tables to socialise at whilst taking coffee and other refreshment were fashionable. These tables took various forms. Small oak or walnut gate leg tables were a favourite often only big enough for two. At the end of the 17th century the tilt top or supper table came into fashion often with a bird cage mechanism which enabled the sitter to spin the beverage around to the guest. Alternatively with the tilt top table the top could be tilted allowing the table to be put against the wall if short of space. 

An 18th century favourite occasional table was the cricket table. A small round table, the cricket table often had a shelf between only three legs the idea being that the three legs would balance better or be more stable on the very often uneven floors.